Author Topic: 1949 Norton model 7  (Read 590 times)

Offline Oggers

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1949 Norton model 7
« on: October 05, 2018, 09:16:27 AM »
Gents

Thoughts on the above? One for sale locally, full resto for 5.5K. What say you?

Cheers

Offline mini-me

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2018, 09:23:29 AM »
Photo?

 dull but quite rare.
Could be a nice bike though.

Offline iansoady

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2018, 09:48:52 AM »
IF the restoration has been well done that's a good price. But we all know how a shiny exterior can hide all sorts of horrors.

I paid slightly less than that for my similarly aged ES2 which was cosmetically tired but most of the mechanicals were in excellent order. I see restored early 50s Nortons at asking prices of 7,500+ although who knows what they actually fetch.
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline mini-me

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2018, 09:55:59 AM »
There is no sense in old bike prices these days, its getting silly;

this week on ebay a Pair of pre war Triumph girders sold for 2,950

a frame and gearbox for same 4,600

two wheels for same 3,582

all to the same buyer.

That makes the Model 7, look like a free gift if its  been done right.

Offline Oggers

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2018, 10:26:50 AM »
I quite like the aesthetically pleasing look of it...

Quote
IF the restoration has been well done that's a good price.

Well, easy to tell from the outside and it does look fine, but internally perhaps a different matter. Apart from the obvious smoke, rattles, horrible big end rumblings, oil condition, and a quick test ride -  How do you tell whether engine/box is well done? 

Offline TGR90B

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2018, 10:35:34 AM »
Use your earoles and experience. If you haven't got the experience, don't get involved.
Getting grumpy.

Offline mini-me

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2018, 10:58:04 AM »
Quote
How do you tell whether engine/box is well done?

Take it to bits and see for yourself.
If you can't do that, or assess for yourself  is it the bike for you.?

I understand scooters are rather good these days. ;)

Offline john.k

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2018, 11:20:39 AM »
The early Norton twins had a name for blowups when rods broke.

Offline iansoady

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2018, 11:23:06 AM »
Yes, but they were being thrashed....

A quick check for any Norton with the pressed steel chaincase is to pop the inspection cap off and look at the primary chain. It should have about 1/2" vertical play; should not be rusty, and should be slightly oily (not dripping). It's something that's often neglected as the primary chaincase is notorious for leaking and leaving the chain dry.
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline Rex

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2018, 11:47:40 AM »
Nice bike, the Model 7 and one I would like one day.
Personally I wouldn't buy a restored bike. You pay a lot for shiny paint and chrome (and possibly sh*tty Taiwanese pattern parts!) without having a clue about the condition of the mechanicals.
Without generalising too much, amateur mechanics range from dumb to terrifying in their abilities, and what is totally spunked to you me and the next bloke might be perfectly OK to the seller...especially when he sees that a new part would cost 100.
Genuine "barn finds" are very popular and for good reason, ie no-one's had their Machine-Mart 100 piece Metrinch junior tool kit anywhere near it, and that's the way I like to buy them. 

Offline iansoady

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2018, 12:03:22 PM »
The trouble is that so many "barn finds" are actually totally knackered bikes that were shoved in  corner for a reason. Or very early "restorations" leaving little of the original bike. Or even "distressed" machines that have been made to look weathered.

I don't believe there are many left in this country although there are probably a lot still in the USA.
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline Rex

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2018, 12:23:09 PM »
I'm happy with "totally knackered" Ian as that's what restoration is all about. Buying a non-running seventy+ year old bike and expecting it to be useable is a bit optimistic!
I appreciate that the term "barn find" means a lot of things to different people; I was using it in the context of "a non-running but basically complete and unmolested" bike, rather than the Ebay "rusty hacked about old Honda being sold on by the ever-hopeful but hopeless Saturday mechanic because he's just broken off another head bolt while attempting to remove them" description. ;)

Offline Oggers

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2018, 01:12:10 PM »
Rex

Quote
Nice bike, the Model 7 and one I would like one day.
Personally I wouldn't buy a restored bike. You pay a lot for shiny paint and chrome (and possibly sh*tty Taiwanese pattern parts!) without having a clue about the condition of the mechanicals.
Without generalising too much, amateur mechanics range from dumb to terrifying in their abilities, and what is totally spunked to you me and the next bloke might be perfectly OK to the seller...especially when he sees that a new part would cost 100.
Genuine "barn finds" are very popular and for good reason, ie no-one's had their Machine-Mart 100 piece Metrinch junior tool kit anywhere near it, and that's the way I like to buy them.

I would actually prefer a resto but a "non-running but basically complete and unmolested bike" is extremely difficult to find. I would shy away from "barn finds" as they tend to be total basket cases and beyond economic repair. I could take it to bits of and start from there - just to check it all out of course!   

Offline Rex

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2018, 01:34:08 PM »
Is anything with Norton on the tank ever beyond economical repair? I suppose there's some desperate piles of shite that are only good for parts but if someone has the abilities to renovate and/or adapt stuff and enjoy doing it then why not?

Even Jubilees and Navigators are steadily increasing in price.... :-\

Offline Oggers

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Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2018, 02:17:59 PM »
Why not? - simply because the cost of restoring aforementioned pile of rust - even with Norton on the tank - would be far more than the end result is worth. If you are doing it for pure enjoyment alone, then that is a different matter. Personally, I would favour a resto, provided it is wipes it face at the end of it. So if you would be good enough to find me a "non-running, but basically complete and unmolested" Vincent for under a grand, I would be most obliged.....  ;D