Author Topic: 1949 Norton model 7  (Read 1412 times)

Offline iansoady

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 400
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2018, 09:56:17 AM »
If the frame number (check very carefully for restamping) matches the V5 then I'd say go for it - but expect to do a fair amount of work. If they don't match then walk (or run) away.

The frame number should be stamped on the left hand side of the front tank support lug, and for a 1952 Model 7 should start with G(1952) 12 (Model 7).
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline Rex

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 922
  • Karma: +11/-67
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2018, 11:24:05 AM »
Chaps

Update on this after speaking with seller.

It is a 1952 model
Frame/engine numbers match on documents but not in reality.
 


But does the frame number match the one in the V5C? If it doesn't then in the eyes of the law you don't have a valid registration, and informing the DVLA of that opens up a big old can of worms as I found out the hard way some years back.

Offline iansoady

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 400
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2018, 11:29:21 AM »
.... I think that's what I just said......
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline mini-me

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 775
  • Karma: +14/-19
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #33 on: October 07, 2018, 11:50:32 AM »
Rum world.

I the 1960/70s  I'd buy a van load of bike parts, this craze for numbers/orginality had not started back then. I'd build up a bike from whatever bits were there, sort out a logbook to suit and use that reg.
After a while I'd return the old buff logbook  for a change to the engine number, back it came duly adjusted, them may be a year or so later ditto with frame number;sometime I'd be asked to bring it to County Hall for inspection,sometimes not. Bingo everything matched the book.
Not really dishonest, as the bikes were not intended for sale and half the time the bike got returned to my shed as parts.
There are a couple about though, one an AJS/Matchless allsorts had bit of BSA, Triumph and several different years of AMC. Engines went from iron to alloy and back again; Last I saw of it was in Bristol in the late 80s, the number I registered it under had been sold off and now lives on a yuppy mobil in Scotland.

Was it a fake? not really, it was a bike of my own creation, did many many miles on it including a trip to Spain. Only sold it due to changing circumstances. Joke was on me because circumstances changed for the better not the worse and I wish I had it now.

So all this feitish with numbers amuses me no end; did Norton actually have matching frame/engine numbers? AMC did not.

Engines get changed over 50 years, so I'd say if the numbers in the V5 match those on the bike, and you got the cash go for it, values are not fixed so who can advise on that? you may get a dog, you may get a gem. That's life.

Personally I think old Norton twins are fugly bikes and wouldn't give one shed room unless it was a freebie



Offline Oggers

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #34 on: October 07, 2018, 11:55:50 AM »
I think the actual frame number does not match the V5. The seller seems to think this is a very long standing issue of 40 years plus years, and not deliberately dishonest. As you gents indicate, he has not informed DVLA as it would indeed open up a can of worms. The alternative is to keep quiet of course. From a purely engineering perspective, to me this is irrelevant, but clearly it surely affects value. i don't want to lose on it should I have to sell it at some point 

Offline TGR90B

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2018, 12:09:35 PM »
Did you ever have serious intention of buying it in the first place? ;D
Getting grumpy.

Offline iansoady

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 400
  • Karma: +4/-0
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2018, 12:15:37 PM »
Nortons did have matching numbers (at least in this period). I would only consider buying this bike if it was REALLY cheap (3K?) as it would be a nightmare with the DVLA. Unless the intention was to break it for parts......
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline mini-me

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 775
  • Karma: +14/-19
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #37 on: October 07, 2018, 12:19:21 PM »
If there are issues with DVLA as seller states, then WALK AWAY.

Seller maybe the most honest bloke to have lived, but DVLA  can and will be a nightmare in the future, they have the power to recall the registration and issue a new one which may even be a Q plate; that makes it almost impossible to insure economically and a pig to resell.

DVLA consider the reg number permanently fixed to the frame, or chassis as they so ignorantly refer to it.

Plus to get that Q plate you''ll have o end of hassle and grief lugging it about to an inspection station.

« Last Edit: October 07, 2018, 12:23:39 PM by mini-me »

Offline Oggers

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 25
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #38 on: October 07, 2018, 12:23:05 PM »
Quote
Did you ever have serious intention of buying it in the first place

Yes, but clearly if subsequently something is not quite right, I am allowed to change my mind.

Ian - thanks for that. I am coming to a similar conclusion. I would buy it and keep quiet, but it needs to be far less than 5.5K. Seller has spent quite a bit, so I don't see that happening though.

Offline Rex

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 922
  • Karma: +11/-67
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
    • View Profile
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #39 on: October 07, 2018, 01:07:33 PM »
If it was a really good bike and you got it for the right price the other option would be to apply for an age-related number using the existing frame number. Despite what the Net may say it's actually straightforward enough.

Offline john.k

  • Advanced Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 240
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: 1949 Norton model 7
« Reply #40 on: October 07, 2018, 10:21:26 PM »
There are a lot of issuses with old bikes now......one major one being the desire of the authorities to crush the 1% ers and their choppers.........most of the draconian old bike legislation in Oz is aimed at the criminal biker gangs.....unfortunately everyone is swept up .........Another issue here is the availability of new made parts to build up complete "vintage :vehicles"...thus circumventing the design rules...........And the greens deciding "old vehicles" are escaping their cherished anti carbon emissions net.