Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Mark M

Pages: [1] 2 3
1
British Bikes / Re: A newbie to vintage bikes
« on: Today at 07:56:30 AM »
On another point, donít be afraid to haggle with a Dealer. If they have a good reputation like Verrals they have earned it so donít expect miracles but cash will talk. The discount may not be as much because of that reputation but a dealer is also subject to consumer protection regulation in a way an Ebay seller isnít. The next big jumble with a wide selection of oldies for sale is Founders Day. Google it if you donít know it.
REgards, Mark

2
British Bikes / Re: GPO BSA BANTAM D1
« on: June 15, 2019, 12:49:35 PM »
R, Royal Enfield may be an exception here, they definitely undercoated in red oxide. Some small parts seem to have been dipped but certainly mudguards, frames etc were primered. Just yesterday I rubbed down a NOS brake pedal (very rare Meteor Minor item actually, very pleased to have found it) and it has the red primer.
REgards, Mark

3
British Bikes / Re: GPO BSA BANTAM D1
« on: June 14, 2019, 10:14:42 AM »
Made in large numbers to contract so I'd say factory painted.
REgards, Mark

4
Thanks R, saves me finding my copy of Gordon May's book "By Miles The Best" which, for anyone who doesn't know it, is a year by year compendium of Factory pictures and brochure shots from 1930 to 1970 including a short technical description of each model. Invaluable for the Enfield enthusiast even if there are a few minor errors and omissions! As to spares for these boxes I remember appeals in the Club magazine for parts, especially the cases but have no idea whether these were ever fulfilled....
REgards, Mark

5
Enfield did indeed make their own boxes for a short period in the 30s. I'm not sure exactly when!  I've never seen one in the metal but I believe it was quite an advanced design with a barrel cam selector arrangement. However it seems to have been spoiled by a lack of metal between the shaft bearings resulting in case damage and cracking.
REgards, Mark

6
Yes, the specifications do vary year to year but don't get confused by the difference in model year. Enfield's production year ran September to August so a bike made on the 1st of Sept 1934 is actually a 1935 model year specification. It's also worth remembering how old the poor thing is, like Noah's hammer quite a few parts will have been changed and usually without regard to originality! I don't know too much about pre-war Enfields but post war they were pretty good at fitting the correct parts, partly because even when at their production peak in the late 50s they made bikes in relatively small batches (looking at the build books 250 would have been a big order) and providing this sort of number of sets of parts is not that difficult. The "they fitted whatever they had to hand" explanation is usually an excuse for an owners poor research or ignorance I'm afraid! On the plus side Enfield followed a policy of commonality of design so there is usually an alternative for the restorer even if it needs slight alteration.
REgards, Mark

7
When searching Autojumbles it pays to be selective. The two big events which cater for pre-War machines are the one at the VMCC Banbury Run (next weekend, the 16th June) and Founder's Day at Stanford Hall, 21st July. It's always worth looking wherever you can but many of the regular jumbles are mostly post War stuff or mixed with modern Jap parts and car bits. Having said that the regular EJP Kempton Park racecourse jumble (next is 20th July) frequently turns up some good stuff. Also be aware that Enfield constantly changed the specification of all their bikes in the 30s, especially the tiddlers, so make sure you know what you're buying! Good luck!
REgards, Mark
PS anyone got a rear wheel complete for a 1934 Model S? It's for a friend, honest!

8
British Bikes / Re: Dunelt T S/A facecam
« on: May 18, 2019, 01:37:09 PM »
Congratulations, that's quite an achievement! Good luck with the rest of it!
REgards, Mark

9
British Bikes / Re: 1970 Interceptor Albion Gear Box
« on: April 27, 2019, 09:25:50 AM »
Excellent news! This is one of the slightly more unusual faults I have found over the years. It is not obvious the clutch pushrod cover has a cutaway to clear the movement of the selector lever, they are often replaced in the wrong orientation when replacing the kick start spring. Another problem is omitting the shim that sits under the neutral finder lever, without it the lever is binding against the selector outer case causing poor or no travel of the gear lever = loss of gears!
REgards, Mark

10
British Bikes / Re: 1970 Interceptor Albion Gear Box
« on: April 25, 2019, 07:02:21 PM »
You may also be interested to know there is a Yahoo Group for Interceptor Owners (actually, it's widened to all Enfield and Indian twins) at  https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/RE_Interceptor/info  If you sign up to join (it's a moderated Group) it may take a few days to approve your application so be patient! Most Group members are in the US as that's where the bulk of the bikes went, you might find an owner near you?
REgards, mark

11
British Bikes / Re: 1970 Interceptor Albion Gear Box
« on: April 23, 2019, 03:51:24 PM »
I have lots of experience with these and some hard won knowledge! This is a selector problem and is covered in the Workshop Manual. Simply put, if you remove the outer cover you will see the selector mechanism in the middle left of the inner cover. There are a pair of holes in the outer plate of the selector which allow you to see the pawls of the selector ratchet. These must be equally spaced away from the inner ratchet plate, the thing with the square hole in the middle and teeth on the outside. The whole selector mechanism is on pillar screws, loosen these to adjust the gap accordingly. You can test ride it without re-fitting the outer cover so take a spanner and play with it. This should fix it, if not come back and I'll take you to the next step. This gearbox will never be wonderful but should be acceptable with careful adjustment! Once sorted it should stay in adjustment by the way...
I also have a 1970 S2 Interceptor as well as a Mk 1 and a 1A.
REgards, Mark

12
British Bikes / Re: Dunelt T S/A facecam
« on: April 12, 2019, 01:58:29 PM »
I think there is a restored example of one of these in the Sammy Miller Museum, New Milton, Hampshire, GB. You could try contacting them as it will have been restored in their own workshops.
REgards, Mark

13
British Bikes / Re: Boyer Ignition for 750 Enfield Interceptor
« on: April 12, 2019, 01:50:52 PM »
Several members of the Interceptor Group have used the Pazon "Altair" product and prefer it. Although they are made in New Zealand they are supported by a technical team here in the UK as well.
REgards, Mark

14
British Bikes / Re: Excelsior Universal 125cc - Rear Plunger
« on: April 05, 2019, 02:58:29 PM »
I spoke with an Excelsior enthusiast pal of mine this morning and he demonstrated the finer points (!) of plunger dismantling on an example which happens to be sitting in his kitchen. Once the nuts top and bottom have been removed the central pillar should just knock out, it's that simple. However in reality, the block on which the wheel spindle sits is bronze bushed and is likely to be seized to the column. Due to the construction method you will struggle to get enough heat and lubrication into this area so you may well have to cut the pillar. He says these were originally a surface ground bar which may be hard to find today in an Imperial size but there is a near Metric equivalent which can be used. Since you will have to rebush the block make new bushes to suit.Either way you'll need a friendly engineer to make up the parts if you can't do it yourself!
REgards, Mark

15
Autojumble / Re: 350 cc side valve JAP engine parts needed
« on: March 06, 2019, 01:02:35 PM »
Our Dating Officer for the REOC tells me Dating Certs are now only good for one year. Although l canít see why, if a thing is identified one day why would it be different the next? Anyway, beware!
REgards, Mark

Pages: [1] 2 3