Author Topic: Scott  (Read 542 times)

Offline iansoady

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Scott
« on: November 10, 2019, 09:51:29 AM »
A (hopefully imminent) house move will see me with greatly enhanced garage space so I am considering extending my "fleet". I've always had a yen for Scotts and nearly bought one about 15 years ago but went for a Venom instead.

I came across this in ebay: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1929-SCOTT-FLYING-SQUIRREL-498cc-TOURER-MATCHING-NUMBERS-VINTAGE-CLASSIC/163920723459 which looks very pretty and is the era I'd be looking at. It seems vastly overpriced to me especially as it's the economy touring model rather than a TT rep. What do people think?

I know the usual advice is to  join the owners' club (which I will probably do) but always respect opinions from the collective wisdom(?) here.
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline mini-me

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Re: Scott
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2019, 10:29:34 AM »
Scotts are one in class of one.
I always liked them, but they are very idiosyncratic, you will get to be a expert in chains, half links,quarter links and more.

there are lots about to choose from,that price seems well over the odds there were a few in  the last Bonhams sale.
Buy from the previous owner and learn a lot.

When I were a sprog, 1964, I came across a 1921 Scott  in the back of a dealer in Tooting that had never been sold, covered in rust but not rotten with a seized engine.

So I wrote to the owners club to discuss the price, and as a  the result it was agreed  that 25 was too high a price............... hindsight eh?

Offline Rex

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Re: Scott
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2019, 10:48:53 AM »
I've got a 1947 Flying Squirrel and it's an absolute joy to ride. It will be the second last to be sold when anno domini starts taking it's toll.
Like a good racehorse they can be finicky and require regular attention, but there's little to touch it for enjoyment when it's on song. Smooth, powerful, nicely-built and guaranteed to be a conversation starter when you park up.
Never ridden a 1920s model but as I understand it they're much the same regarding maintenance requirements and pleasure of ownership. The earlier bikes are two speed and the later ones three speed, and some consider that to be a drawback when riding.
The SOC is a good club (for spares and info) but it doesn't seem to be the place to buy one as they seem to be rarely advertised. I would suggest CarandClassic or good old Ebay might be better.

Offline iansoady

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Re: Scott
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2019, 10:52:59 AM »
Thanks Rex.

Actually, following MiniMe I looked at Bonhams and guess what? That very bike sold in October for 8,625 including premium. Talk about a mark-up!
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline mini-me

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Re: Scott
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2019, 01:55:22 PM »
I thought it was familiar, several of the bikes sold have popped up very quickly on ebay, . Seems its dealers pushing the auction prices up.

As an ex-dealer,  I feel such high markups are not good, I only ever worked ona 10% margin and quick turn round.

Maybe they will get burnt fingers, there are bikes on offer on ebay at very silly prices proving that the seller is very very  hopeful and in pig ignorance of what he is selling;
Levis for one example.

too many effing amateurs in the game now.

On the other hand, you know what he paid for it, haggle.

Offline iansoady

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Re: Scott
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2019, 01:59:13 PM »
Yes indeed. I would go to 10,000 as an absolute max which gives him a good 1,000. But I'll probably let it lie for the moment.

Following Rex's point, it may be that a later model would suit me better but very early days and I may yet be put off by the challenge!

In the same Bonhams sale there was a later 600cc bike for 6,900 which seems even more realistic. https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25384/lot/327/
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline Rex

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Re: Scott
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2019, 03:46:48 PM »
As the blurb says, it's a much later alternator engine fitted to that bike, and the wheel rims (front looks to alloy, rear chrome) don't match, which is not something I'd expect for the thick end of 7 grand.
It could be a good bike (personally I like girders) but it could also be something toshed up for resale. I'd want a good look first before I bid.

Offline mini-me

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Re: Scott
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2019, 04:28:28 PM »
Drop that on the nearside it will be very expensive.

Offline john.k

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Re: Scott
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2019, 09:16:49 PM »
My take on the old bike scene now is that I see very ,very few bikes offered for sale by bona fide owner/riders and a multitude of dealers with showrooms? crammed with dozens of classic bikes at very high prices.Typically twice what i would think realistic......Now I know the place is awash with drug money ,which is often spent on classic bikes,but enough to sustain the market?.......and I see the hate for for IC vehicles gaining momentum quite rapidly.

Offline iansoady

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Re: Scott
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2019, 10:30:57 AM »
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline Rex

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Re: Scott
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2019, 04:11:44 PM »
Looks good to me. Must be one of the very last to have the oil tank in the petrol tank and mag ignition.
Looks like it has the epicyclic gear conversion to alter the Pilgrim pump settings ie allows the pump to have the ports wider open to ensure better and more consistent oil delivery at low engine speed.
Nice bike, but then I'm biased! ;)

Offline iansoady

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Re: Scott
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2019, 04:57:20 PM »
Yes, thought you'd like it. It looks fairly unmolested and (as far as my limited knowledge goes) original.

Does the guide price look reasonable to you, assuming a reserve of 6,000? Actually, looking at the auction site, it's 4,000 - 6,000 which looks better. https://bikes.charterhouse-auction.com/product/a-1948-scott-flying-squirrel

From what I've read, the post war models are considered less desirable and heavier than the earlier bikes but as far as I can see apart from the Dowty forks there's little difference.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2019, 04:59:07 PM by iansoady »
Ian
1952 Norton ES2
1982 Moto Guzzi V50

Offline Rex

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Re: Scott
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2019, 06:23:16 PM »
I think it's another one of those bikes that the later it is, the less "desirable" it is, which isn't to say that the later Brum Scotts etc aren't desirable, just that a pre-war girder/rigid would be more sought-after.
Personally I would say that if you got that for 4000 you'd have bought a bargain and at 6000 you wouldn't have paid too much, but that's only going by the pics obviously.
If it hasn't been used in a while you may have to budget for a mag rebuild, but that goes for every old bike. The only detail I can see that's not original is the dome nuts on the engine through studs. Originally it would have had half nuts and  locknuts on each end, but that's pretty much irrelevant anyway. Going to bid for it then?

Offline mini-me

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Re: Scott
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2019, 08:32:22 PM »
Go for it, a 1948 Scott isn't much different to a 1938 one apart from Girders, which the trendy beardies hipsters brigade think are "kool"

Thse will be Dowty forks I think? seals can be problematic but some one must ahave sorted a mod out for them by now.

My brother once owned a very late Scott, 1960-ish, it was just as quirky as any Scott.

This time of year is probably a good time to buy.

Offline Rex

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Re: Scott
« Reply #14 on: November 26, 2019, 09:24:00 PM »
The trick with Dowtys is either to get a seal and rebuild kit from the Panther Owners Club and overhaul them, or (also from the PoC) a spring conversion kit.
I like them personally as they're really compliant over bumps, and though they're not totally oil-tight they seem to hold their pressure well. Incidentally the bike in the auction pic is down on it's bump-stops at the front.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2019, 09:27:20 PM by Rex »