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Messages - cardan

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1

I wonder if it's worth LESS after its restoration? A bike is only original once.

Leon

2
The Classic Biker Bar / Re: Manx Norton
« on: Today at 04:54:09 AM »

Hi Hughie,

It's interesting to consider the best ways to find information.

First, it helps to ask for what you want: so you're not "looking to find out all I can about a bike racer called tony godfrey who raced a Manx in the iom" but instead you'd like to contact someone who knows him? Fair enough. Sorry I don't know him. I live in Australia and don't know too many of the 65-odd million residents of the UK.

But here's the real suggestion: Tell us what you know about him. Tell us why you want to know more. Post some photos. Give us some hints. Get us interested.

You never know, people can sometimes help in unexpected ways (maybe someone lived around the corner from Tony Godfrey in Bitterne, Southampton in 1962), but in the absence of an interesting story don't expect too much.

Cheers

Leon




3
Identify these bikes! / Re: Great Uncle Ben's 1920's bike...any ideas?
« on: August 17, 2018, 10:35:06 AM »
Did Calthorpe supply engines to other makers ?

I don't think so.

Leon

4
The Classic Biker Bar / Re: Manx Norton
« on: August 17, 2018, 05:04:54 AM »

https://www.imuseum.im/search/collections/people/mnh-agent-1276374.html

https://www.iomtt.com/tt-database/events/races?meet_code=ALL&ride_id=1968

A long and successful career by the look of it. In addition to Norton he rode Velocette, Matchless, AJS, EMC, Yamaha, Villiers, Kawasaki, Coleshill Seeley, Aermacchi, and Goddard Bultaco at various TT or Manx Grand Prix events between 1956 and 1972. There should be no shortage of information out there.

Good luck.

Leon


5
Identify these bikes! / Re: Great Uncle Ben's 1920's bike...any ideas?
« on: August 17, 2018, 01:06:10 AM »
Maybe a customized New Hudson with Calthorpe engine ?

Which had to be canted slightly forward to fit in the frame?

My immediate thoughts on this bike were "Calthorpe", but when I looked at the model range I could make no sense of it. New Hudson (or similar) with Calthorpe motor is not a bad guess. The depression was a time for making do with what was about.

Cheers

Leon

6
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help identify Coventry Eagle, 1928 or 1929?
« on: August 03, 2018, 01:15:48 AM »

The image in the post above comes from The Motor Cycle, 27 Oct 1927 - "First Special Show Number". I had a flip through the following week's issue (you guessed it - "Second Special Show Number") and there is another description of the Coventry Eagle range, which included "LAST YEAR'S MODEL" of the "FLYING 500". So it's likely that image of the 500 from the previous week shows it in 1927 trim, and re-iterates earlier comments about Cov Eagle offering last year's model while they were still available. Based on all this, it wouldn't surprise me if a 1928-numbered Coventry Eagle left the factory in later 1928 or early 1929 with a 1929 JAP motor.

Cheers

Leon

7
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help identify Coventry Eagle, 1928 or 1929?
« on: August 03, 2018, 12:51:41 AM »
Hi Michael,

Nice project.

We seem to talk about Coventry Eagles quite a lot here: use the search box at the top to have a look at older discussions. For example have a look at http://classicmotorcycleforum.com/index.php?topic=5610 where we discussed 1928-29-30 models.

42529 as a Coventry Eagle frame number seems to be more 1928 than 1929, and your frame is of the earlier type with the gearbox mounted from the top, and bolt-on stays from the bottom of the gearbox plates to the lugs dangling down from the frame near the rear axle.

The 1928 models at the Olympia Show in October 1927 included a sports 350 to this spec. The attached illustration from The Motor Cycle shows the 500 - a bit different from your bike with curved front down tube and Brampton (?) fork. But note comments in earlier discussions about Cov Eagle - small firm with varying specification that depended on what old stuff was lying around the factory at the time.

Cheers

Leon


8
British Bikes / Re: 1952 Norton ES2 spark plug
« on: July 19, 2018, 12:34:20 PM »
In vintage times it was common practice to hide the spark plug in a deep hole away from the combustion chamber...

My favourite is the EW Douglas (350 side-valve twin) from the late 1920s - the plugs are well masked down a hole, and the ignition timing is a staggering 50 degrees BTDC!

Leon

9
Identify these bikes! / Re: Any help with ID of this 1900's frame ?
« on: June 18, 2018, 01:22:56 PM »

Metric measurements make sense, because the frame is French, from a 1904-5 Alcyon. This model was usually seen with a Buchet motor - it appears there was a lightweight version using a Swiss Zedel motor, but this used a slightly different central lug.

The black-and-white illustration shows the Alcyon-Buchet. I had trouble finding drawings or photos that showed the frame details to compare with the surviving frame, but I did find some photos of a "restored" Alcyon "racer", fitted with an OHV Buchet motor. I strongly suspect this machine is not what it pretends to be, and that the frame is the standard Alcyon frame with the lower tank rail removed to make room for the tall OHV engine. I could be wrong; perhaps it is real. Anyway, if you study the photos I think you'll find - lower tank rail detail apart - that the frame is the same as the one under discussion here.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/amelien/599426892
https://www.flickr.com/photos/amelien/599117041

Cheers

Leon

10
Identify these bikes! / Re: Any help with ID of this 1900's frame ?
« on: June 18, 2018, 12:34:57 AM »

Yes it could be a small v-twin, or equally a single. I haven't looked at Sarolea, but I was thinking of Fafnir. Can you measure the width of the lugs that take the engine plates? Fafnir motors used very narrow lugs.

Against a continental id is that some of the frame lugs are quite heavy, particularly the one at the lower end of the steering head. European stuff was typically quite elegant. Brown Bros was a good thought, but I can't see the funny bottom bracket lug anywhere in the Brown range.

Cheers

Leon

11
British Bikes / Re: Coventry Eagle Silent Superb Fuel Tap
« on: June 16, 2018, 12:47:59 AM »

12
British Bikes / Re: Coventry Eagle Silent Superb Fuel Tap
« on: June 16, 2018, 12:27:40 AM »

Here's an earlier discussion on the hexagON tap: http://classicmotorcycleforum.com/index.php?topic=5335.msg22597#msg22597

A google search for "ewarts plunger tap" brings up lots of photos, like the one below.

Both tap types were widely used, and there are lots of variants, and lots of modern reproductions.

Cheers

Leon



13
British Bikes / Re: Coventry Eagle Silent Superb Fuel Tap
« on: June 15, 2018, 12:34:44 AM »

Hi Mike,

A quick google shows most restored Cov Eagles of this type use a sliding push-pull (hexag-on) type tap, with a flat slide and cork seals in the body.

However I think I spy in some period photos and adverts an Ewarts-type push-pull tap - the one with the single-ended cylindrical slider with the cork seal attached.

If you want the bike to be very correct, perhaps contact the Cov Eagle marque specialist at the VMCC, or try John Hodson via https://www.coventryeaglemotorcycle.org.uk/index.html to get the real story.

In either case, instead of the tap screwing into the fitting, there is obviously a couple of brass pieces required to complement the tap: a top bit with a thread, and a bottom bit, to secure the tap in position.

Interesting detail - let us know if you come up with an illustration of the original.

Cheers

Leon

14
Identify these bikes! / Re: Any help with ID of this 1900's frame ?
« on: June 15, 2018, 12:07:30 AM »

Oh very nice. Probably around 1904-1906, but not Werner, Peugeot, or indeed not one of the more common machines. The key identifying feature will be the one-piece lug that forms the rear engine mount and the pedal bracket. It doesn't ring any bells at the moment, but an excellent challenge!

Cheers

Leon

15
British Bikes / Re: Watney m/c
« on: June 12, 2018, 08:02:15 AM »
The rule of thumb is that the number of crosses should be less than the number of spokes divided by 9. Thus 4-cross is ok for 40-spoke wheels, possible for 36, but unstable for 32 or anything less.

If the wheel is asymmetric - different flange sizes or different offsets - the lacing pattern is sometimes different on each side.

If you follow the link in the post above to my spoke length calculator, you'll find suggestions there for how to deal with asymmetric wheels. Make the appropriate measurements, plug the numbers into the calculator, and it will tell you the spoke lengths required.

Have fun.

Leon

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