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Messages - cardan

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 44
1
British Bikes / Re: Thread size
« on: November 12, 2017, 08:48:44 PM »

Hi Phil,

It's worth pointing out that Ian has a long record of being extremely helpful, and always civil, both here and elsewhere.

In this case, he makes an excellent point. The question is not so much the thread size on a brand new B31, but the thread size on a particular 70-year-old B31. They could easily be two different things. Measure the threads on your bolts with a micrometer/vernier and a thread pitch gauge, and look up the corresponding thread (Radco's The Vintage Motorcyclist's Workshop has comprehensive tables). If it's bizarre or unexpected then it's worth asking on a forum, but otherwise...

Leon

2
British Bikes / Re: 55' 350 Goldie wheel spokes question.
« on: November 07, 2017, 10:32:10 PM »

Hi Ken,

There is a well-known expression that describes a 0.250" nipple in a 0.300" hole, but let's just call it wrong. Sounds like the washers under the nipples were there to stop the nipples falling through the rim!!

I enjoy building wheels, and I have a bit of an eye for them. A properly-built spoked wheel is a lovely thing, but badly-built wheels are everywhere. Two of the common problems are wrong nipple size and mismatched rims/hub combinations. A variation of the latter problem is when the rim has been laced to the wrong sides of an asymmetric  hub.

Hopefully your new nipples will be the correct size for the holes in the rim. Before you start building the wheel, use a spoke with a nipple attached to look at how the dimpling and drilling on your rim suits your hub: push the nipple hard into the hole with your thumb and the spoke should point quite closely to the hole it is to go in on the hub flange.

Cheers

Leon

3
British Bikes / Re: 55' 350 Goldie wheel spokes question.
« on: November 07, 2017, 09:25:26 AM »

Practice makes perfect! Enjoy. Don't forget to oil the nipples - the thread and the outside - for smooth tensioning, or use anti-seize if you're going stainless.

Cheers

Leon

4
Autojumble / Re: wanted for 1924 raleigh 350
« on: November 07, 2017, 09:20:57 AM »

There are a couple of different sizes - can you let us know which one you are looking for?

Leon

5
British Bikes / Re: 55' 350 Goldie wheel spokes question.
« on: November 06, 2017, 05:47:20 AM »

Hi Kennij,

These washers were used a lot on bicycle wheels, to spread the load from the nipple. I've also seen them used on vinatge steel and alloy motorcycle rims  for the same purpose, so if you have older alloy rims it might be a good idea to use something similar. However on a dimpled rim, properly drilled so that each spoke hole points towards the appropriate hole on the rim, nipple washers should not be necessary.

A couple of warnings. Nipples come in 0.025" steps in diameter, so make sure your new nipples are a good fit to the holes in your rim. Tighten the spokes carefully and uniformly and by hand. It's surprisingly easy to damage a rim or hub with over-excited used of an electric screwdriver!

Cheers

Leon

6
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 09, 2017, 10:37:56 PM »

OK. I've dug out the Show Issues of The Motor Cycle which I should have done before putting pen to paper.

1928 colour scheme was black tank with red nose, 1929 had the white splash as per Helmut's CE-1929 image and the Charles Howell bike. The Motor Cycle used the same CE-1929 illustration posted by Helmut. Amazingly "last year's model" is discussed in the Show Report - no embarrassment about selling off unsold bikes from the previous year.

Cheers

Leon

7
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 09, 2017, 10:19:06 PM »

Fabulous Helmut - thanks for posting! Looks like the white splash is good for 1929 as well. Of course CE was a pretty small manufacturer, and around 1930 their "bread and butter" was the little pressed-frame two stroke, and their glamour bikes were the big twins, so the singles may have been produced in pretty small numbers with somewhat variable spec. But the CH-1929 photo is pretty good evidence that the bike was around in that year.

I wonder if Charles Howell rode the bike to work at the studio?

Times have changed.

Cheers

Leon

8
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 09, 2017, 09:43:11 AM »

Re the date, I think (but I'm not absolutely certain) that the white splash on the CC tanks was a 1930-1931-ish thing. Earlier in the 1920s, the tank was black with a scarlet nose.

Leon

9
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 06, 2017, 10:53:32 PM »
...possibly this ones Sister?
https://motoclassics.nl/en/motorcycle/coventry-eagle-g54-the-flying-500

Yes something like that. Sloping motors were a 1931 thing for many makers (in this case Sturmey Archer). The attached advert from Graces Guide https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Coventry-Eagle_Cycle_and_Motor_Co in June 1930 shows the side-valve version of "our" bike.

Leon

10
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 06, 2017, 12:27:01 PM »

The last time I suggested a bike was a Coventry Eagle I was quite wrong. This time, however, I'm quite sure as I can read "Eagle" on the tank and see the winged CE logo underneath.

1930-ish, and a 350 or 500 OHV. Very sporty, but I can't quite nail down the exact model.

Cheers

Leon

11

Hi Ben,

Two interesting lightweights from the 1930s. The top bike is Panther, and the lower is New Imperial. I suppose both are 250s or there-abouts. No doubt thumbing through photos on the interweb will deliver an exact indentification. The New Imperials from this period were interesting in that the engine/gearbox was unit construction.

Cheers

Leon

12
Identify these bikes! / Re: Rusted, hanging on the wall in a Melbourne cafe
« on: September 09, 2017, 10:56:24 AM »
Well done! I'm pleased we didn't see you on the news.

Looking closer at the motor - oil box without a detachable cover - it's of the type used c 1920. These mostly had a 20/ prefix to the engine number. The EXU is a common suffix, and denotes three features of the motor. From 1921 the engine number would have a letter prefix like KT/N. So I'd say the motor is 1920-ish.

Good coffee?

Leon

13
European and Other Bikes / Re: Terrot MT 1, 100cc 2 stroke: non-starter!
« on: September 07, 2017, 12:41:33 AM »
I mentioned earlier that those old plain bush 2 stroke engines need a strong oil/ petrol mix
SAE 40 at maybe 12 to 1,
As said its the oil that makes the "sealing" work

I've read this lots of times, but I think it should say "worn out plain bush engines might actually run if you put heaps of thick oil in the fuel".

In my experience if the mainshafts are round and true, and the bushes are line reamed to give a close running fit, the motor will run fine on the usual (for modern oils) 25 or 30:1.

The key place to look for wear in an old two stroke is in the mainshafts/main bushes, and in the cylinder just above the ports (not just near the top as in a four stroke). A 2-stroke with too much wear at these places will not run properly. Sort it out, and you'll be amazed.

Cheers

Leon

14
British Bikes / Re: The Bruce/Wassall 110 mph Matchless/Rudge
« on: September 05, 2017, 02:05:57 PM »
Didn't that oddball  OHC Matchless with the exhaust out the side have a Brough shape tank with two fillers?

Google the 1928 catalogue - Matchless built everything that year, from a veteran-looking Model H sidecar outfit to quite sexy beasts with the Brough-like tankyou mention.

33D6: Yes I see now how it all bolts up. Let me see if I can find a parts list, or maybe you can dig out a frame illustration for me.

This little bit of research is part of a huge thing I'm doing on racing Rudges. I have a 1932 Works Rudge, complete, and I certainly don't want another! However I have the head for the Wassall/Bruce Matchless/Rudge (it's 1928-29 Works only, with longer rocker-plate mounting studs to attach the struts seen in the photos), but the bottom end of the motor is with an enthusiast in Melbourne. It's a late-season 1929 Works motor, and quite different from the Ulster that was the hottest thing available to the public. Because it has no frame, I think building a replica would be a good use of the parts - so don't lose those frame bits!

Re the tank, it has a rather distinctive shape - horizontal for the front bit, then sloping down. Unlike those posted above that slope most of their length? Could it be from something like a 1928 250 R/S? This has the oil tank upstairs, as seen on the Wassal bike.

Cheers

Leon

15
British Bikes / Re: The Bruce/Wassall 110 mph Matchless/Rudge
« on: September 05, 2017, 01:18:21 AM »

Ah... I had noticed that the 350 was devoid of sidecar lugs, but I hadn't appreciated that the 500 frame was so different.

Alan Bruce tells the story of the origin of the Wassall 350 Matchless racer: the bike was unpacked from the original crate, but built up by Bruce as a racer, with all the unusued parts going back to the dealer in exchange for "an allowance". Apparently it was never as fast as the 350 AJS Wassall had ridden previously, although he had a loyal following and the crowds still came to watch him race at the Motordrome.

Here's an illustration of the 500 V2 frame. I'm particularly interested in the strip-steel drilled flats that carried the adjustable foot rests. Were these (or something like them) used on the 350? The reason I ask is that a pair of these strips came from the same shed as the Rudge racing engine. I wonder if it could be from the Pringle Rudge/Matchless?

Still looking for ideas on the origin of the tank.

Cheers

Leon

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