Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - cardan

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 50
1
British Bikes / Re: Help idenify this old bike.
« on: January 21, 2019, 10:29:23 PM »
Or 33d6 could be right: the 250cc B21 and the 350cc B24 were quite similar in 1939, so the racer could be a 350. Interesting that prewar the 250 and 350 used the same base with the 500 quite different; but postwar it was the 350 and 500 that were similar, with the 250 quite different.

Cheers

Leon

2
British Bikes / Re: Help idenify this old bike.
« on: January 21, 2019, 02:42:27 AM »
The motor seems to be late 1930s 250 BSA - something like a 1939 B21. Lots of creativity elsewhere.

Cheers

Leon

3
European and Other Bikes / Re: 1929 Motobecane M2 JAP 250
« on: January 11, 2019, 10:29:57 AM »
Cheer up you lot - it's a new year! A pretty little bike.

The Staub was a pretty fair copy of the Burman. I wonder if they paid a licence fee?

Cheers

Leon




4
British Bikes / Re: Nut Sizes
« on: December 04, 2018, 08:46:50 AM »
FN used a lot of existing gun fitting threads.....for instance the 1/4" x 22 thread is from the two triggerguard screws of the 1889 Mauser rifle that FN was set up to make.

Thanks John - I hadn't heard the story about the machinery before. The various histories of FN are pretty quiet about what happened in Liege during the two wars...

The 3/16 thread used by FN is 3/16-30, still used to secure the grip on a pistol!

Cheers

Leon

5
British Bikes / Re: Nut Sizes
« on: December 04, 2018, 03:58:46 AM »
Sigh - sometimes it isn't easy!

: imperial (labelled AF, where 7/8"AF means 7/8" across the flats.

If a spanner was labelled 7/8 AF it would be for a Unified (SAE) threadform, not Imperial, and unless the OP had a post 1968 Triumph, BSA or early H-D it wouldn't fit the fasteners.

Well, not really. Hexagon sizes and threads are very often unrelated. Believe it or not, pre-WW1 Belgium-built FN motorcycles used all their own threads - unlike anything else but of imperial diameters (1/4-22, 5/16-20, 3/8-18 and other weird things), with imperial hexagons (7/16"AF, 1/2"AF etc.)

I have an Australian-made motorcycle and most of the fasteners have BSW threads, but with imperial hexagons.

As I noted above, AF just means "across flats" and does not make any comment on the thread to be found on the fastener.

It's all good fun!

Leon

6
British Bikes / Re: Nut Sizes
« on: December 03, 2018, 09:12:38 PM »
Sigh - sometimes it isn't easy!

The only difference between "old" and "new" whitworth hexagons is that the early ones have one size larger hexagon. i.e. an old (say pre WW1) 1/2 W nut has the same size hex (0.920" AF - across flats) as a post WW2 9/16 W nut. Spanners and sockets are often labelled 1/2W-9/16BS to reflect this.

Thus "whitworth" tools fit old or new "whitworth" hexagons.

More-or-less there are only three options for hexagons, which are always measured AF (across the flats): imperial (labelled AF, where 7/8"AF means 7/8" across the flats. Similarly metric is measured AF, so 21mm is 21 mm across the flats.

Only Whitworth/British Standard have "silly" AF measurements, which can be googled.

(I'm not going to mention BA hexagons! Luckily these are small, and not used on axles.)

Good luck!

Leon

7
Identify these bikes! / Re: Does anyone know what kind of bike this is?
« on: November 22, 2018, 10:23:09 PM »
Mustang perhaps? http://www.mmcoa.org/

Leon

Worth posting a photo of a Mustang brochure from the above site. Very entertaining!

8
British Bikes / Re: 1920s cone hubs
« on: October 22, 2018, 03:48:57 AM »
British axles are usually cycle thread - either 26 or 20 tpi - try Nooky's Nuts either online or on ebay. Note that 20 tpi UNF nuts can be forced onto a 20 tpi BScy axle, but don't do it. Best to measure the thread first, as some axles have unusual threads - often 24 tpi.

Leon

9
British Bikes / Re: 1920s cone hubs
« on: October 21, 2018, 07:20:11 AM »

Lots of hubs - even good quality ones - from the early 1920s didn't use locknuts. I've done thousands of miles on bikes without them, with no problem.

Cheers

Leon

10
British Bikes / Re: Anyone into Scotts here
« on: October 07, 2018, 10:51:12 PM »

Many years of fun and anguish for the purchaser of any of the three lots! Great to see such good quality "junk" is still around.

I assume the BMW will attract quite a crowd - OHV and I suppose pre-war?

Leon

11
British Bikes / Re: Please Identify Bike
« on: August 29, 2018, 09:11:11 AM »

Hi Ung,

Nice one. The bike is an early 1920s P&M (Phelon and Moore), the forerunner to the famous "Panther".

In 1921 (or so) they tried a disastrous motor with fins parallel to the ground, so I suspect this one is 1922-23. Possibly with a 4-speed gearbox rather than the earlier 2-speed-primary-chain setup. Google will provide many photos for comparison.

The bike was a few years old by 1930, which explains the non-standard paint scheme.

Cheers

Leon

12

I hadn't realised there was a WD version of the the RE 250, but there's a nice discussion here from 11 years ago... http://classicmotorcycleforum.com/index.php?topic=681.0

Leon

13

Given the issue date of the rego, I assume we're at the other end of the 1930s, so something like a 1939 Model D (250). As 33d6 says, engine and frame numbers would enable a proper id.

Leon

14
The Classic Biker Bar / Re: Manx Norton
« on: August 19, 2018, 11:33:41 PM »

Truly amazing! I wonder if Tony was just around the corner...

Here he is on his Manx in 1961, from https://www.mediastorehouse.com/

Leon

15

I wonder if it's worth LESS after its restoration? A bike is only original once.

Leon

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 50