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Messages - cardan

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1
British Bikes / Re: Coventry Eagle
« on: May 08, 2019, 11:07:19 PM »

Very lovely - no doubt 33d6 will explain the fine qualities of the 175 cc Super Sport engine. It's pretty special. The c1930 Villiers Super Sport, or the larger 6 port Levis, have surprisingly lively performance, particularly if the rider is not carrying too much "excess baggage". The light weight of the machine itself is undervalued. What a joy it is to have a machine that can be wheeled around, put on and off its stand, and started with ease.

Enjoy!

Leon

2
Identify these bikes! / Re: Barr and Stroud mystery bike
« on: May 05, 2019, 11:38:15 PM »
Yep, during 1933 Edward Francis Arblaster, 26 Fifth Ave, Mount Lawley, Western Australia, Engineer, patented his engine in (at least) Britain, France, Germany, Spain and the US. Probably in Australia too, but old Australian patents are a bit fiddly to research.

He was pretty serious, but did it go into production anywhere?

Cheers

Leon

(Add 30 minutes to the time sheet for the Arblaster non-entry!! Unless we can find he built a motorcycle in Australia...)

3
Identify these bikes! / Re: Barr and Stroud mystery bike
« on: May 05, 2019, 11:21:43 PM »

I suppose Arblaster had patents to protect his design - no doubt they would describe his idea in detail.

Re Ever Onward: its interesting how the bike that Warren put together is very representative of how a 1920s-assembled B&S would have looked. There were a small number of B&S-engined bikes built in Australia in the period, and the photo below shows a GCS from Melbourne. Perhaps the sleeve-valve experts can identify the model of the B&S engine?

The A to Z book is a bit daunting, but getting there. One problem is that one hour spent on each of 530 entries is about 4 months at 40 hours per week! Most entries require - and deserve - a good deal more than one hour, so it's a big job.

Mr Arblaster, for example, has already consumed several hours, but unless we can find something to suggest he built the motorcycle testbed for his engine in Australia (or even that he built the engine in Australia) he probably won't even get a mention in the book!

Cheers

Leon

4
Identify these bikes! / Re: Barr and Stroud mystery bike
« on: April 29, 2019, 04:31:11 AM »

Hi JFerg and others,

Rather than start a new thread I thought I's resurrect this one, since I have a question about sleeve-valve motorcycles in Australia and there's already some guff above.

Rob Saward and I are doing a new edition of the "A to Z of Australian-Made Motorcycles" - there are 530+ entries so far, plenty to keep us busy.

One unconfirmed machine is the Arblaster, said to have been made by Mr Arblaster in Western Australia.

I have found is an article from 1933 saying that E. F. Arblaster designed a new type of sleeve-valve engine, and that it was being tested in an experimental motorcycle in the UK.

I wonder does anyone know anything about Mr Arblaster's engine?

JFerg: I know it's a long shot, but we know there were Barr and Stroud sleeve-valve engines in WA in the 1920s. I don't suppose Arblaster's name can be linked in to these?

If Mr Arblaster built a motorcycle in Australia, particularly with an engine of his own design, we could give it an entry in the book. However if the engine and motorcycle testbed were assembled in the UK to his design, I guess we'll have to leave him out.

Cheers

Leon

5
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help Identifying bike from 1919 photo
« on: March 31, 2019, 11:45:45 PM »

Yes I'm not sure what's going on with the front hub - but the bike is certainly the 4 h.p. (550cc) Triumph Model H. It used the 3-speed Sturmey Archer CS (counter shaft) gearbox, with belt final drive. I recall there were 25,000+ of these built for the war effort. At the Armistice in Nov 1918 there were 17,998 total on the books - 9,813 "overseas" and 8,185 "at home" (in the UK).

The petrol tank was a silver-grey (my guess more grey on the military models - not much of an advantage to glitter) with green panels. The rest was black, with small parts nickel plated.

What's the book about Matt?

Cheers

Leon

6
British Bikes / Re: Help idenify this old bike.
« on: January 21, 2019, 10:29:23 PM »
Or 33d6 could be right: the 250cc B21 and the 350cc B24 were quite similar in 1939, so the racer could be a 350. Interesting that prewar the 250 and 350 used the same base with the 500 quite different; but postwar it was the 350 and 500 that were similar, with the 250 quite different.

Cheers

Leon

7
British Bikes / Re: Help idenify this old bike.
« on: January 21, 2019, 02:42:27 AM »
The motor seems to be late 1930s 250 BSA - something like a 1939 B21. Lots of creativity elsewhere.

Cheers

Leon

8
European and Other Bikes / Re: 1929 Motobecane M2 JAP 250
« on: January 11, 2019, 10:29:57 AM »
Cheer up you lot - it's a new year! A pretty little bike.

The Staub was a pretty fair copy of the Burman. I wonder if they paid a licence fee?

Cheers

Leon




9
British Bikes / Re: Nut Sizes
« on: December 04, 2018, 08:46:50 AM »
FN used a lot of existing gun fitting threads.....for instance the 1/4" x 22 thread is from the two triggerguard screws of the 1889 Mauser rifle that FN was set up to make.

Thanks John - I hadn't heard the story about the machinery before. The various histories of FN are pretty quiet about what happened in Liege during the two wars...

The 3/16 thread used by FN is 3/16-30, still used to secure the grip on a pistol!

Cheers

Leon

10
British Bikes / Re: Nut Sizes
« on: December 04, 2018, 03:58:46 AM »
Sigh - sometimes it isn't easy!

: imperial (labelled AF, where 7/8"AF means 7/8" across the flats.

If a spanner was labelled 7/8 AF it would be for a Unified (SAE) threadform, not Imperial, and unless the OP had a post 1968 Triumph, BSA or early H-D it wouldn't fit the fasteners.

Well, not really. Hexagon sizes and threads are very often unrelated. Believe it or not, pre-WW1 Belgium-built FN motorcycles used all their own threads - unlike anything else but of imperial diameters (1/4-22, 5/16-20, 3/8-18 and other weird things), with imperial hexagons (7/16"AF, 1/2"AF etc.)

I have an Australian-made motorcycle and most of the fasteners have BSW threads, but with imperial hexagons.

As I noted above, AF just means "across flats" and does not make any comment on the thread to be found on the fastener.

It's all good fun!

Leon

11
British Bikes / Re: Nut Sizes
« on: December 03, 2018, 09:12:38 PM »
Sigh - sometimes it isn't easy!

The only difference between "old" and "new" whitworth hexagons is that the early ones have one size larger hexagon. i.e. an old (say pre WW1) 1/2 W nut has the same size hex (0.920" AF - across flats) as a post WW2 9/16 W nut. Spanners and sockets are often labelled 1/2W-9/16BS to reflect this.

Thus "whitworth" tools fit old or new "whitworth" hexagons.

More-or-less there are only three options for hexagons, which are always measured AF (across the flats): imperial (labelled AF, where 7/8"AF means 7/8" across the flats. Similarly metric is measured AF, so 21mm is 21 mm across the flats.

Only Whitworth/British Standard have "silly" AF measurements, which can be googled.

(I'm not going to mention BA hexagons! Luckily these are small, and not used on axles.)

Good luck!

Leon

12
Identify these bikes! / Re: Does anyone know what kind of bike this is?
« on: November 22, 2018, 10:23:09 PM »
Mustang perhaps? http://www.mmcoa.org/

Leon

Worth posting a photo of a Mustang brochure from the above site. Very entertaining!

13
British Bikes / Re: 1920s cone hubs
« on: October 22, 2018, 03:48:57 AM »
British axles are usually cycle thread - either 26 or 20 tpi - try Nooky's Nuts either online or on ebay. Note that 20 tpi UNF nuts can be forced onto a 20 tpi BScy axle, but don't do it. Best to measure the thread first, as some axles have unusual threads - often 24 tpi.

Leon

14
British Bikes / Re: 1920s cone hubs
« on: October 21, 2018, 07:20:11 AM »

Lots of hubs - even good quality ones - from the early 1920s didn't use locknuts. I've done thousands of miles on bikes without them, with no problem.

Cheers

Leon

15
British Bikes / Re: Anyone into Scotts here
« on: October 07, 2018, 10:51:12 PM »

Many years of fun and anguish for the purchaser of any of the three lots! Great to see such good quality "junk" is still around.

I assume the BMW will attract quite a crowd - OHV and I suppose pre-war?

Leon

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