Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - cardan

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 46
16
Identify these bikes! / Re: Mid 20,s Beesa,s.... I think
« on: December 30, 2017, 10:12:51 PM »

B48159 is a very high frame number; it takes us all the way to 1929! So certainly wedge tank. For 1929, the B29 De Luxe (250) engines started at B 42108, frames started at B 47120. If you have an engine B43000-ish it probably goes with the frame.

Sausage tanks started in 1924 at engine number 1. The motors didn't change much, although I think the oil pump arrangement on the timing cover was one visible change.

Cheers

Leon

17
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help identifying bike frame
« on: December 17, 2017, 10:53:23 AM »

Sure to be the frame number, but you're going to have to contact the Velocette Owners' Club to verify what I am about to say.

I have a number of Velocette books, including Ivan Rhodes' "Technical Excellence Exemplified". In the back it has a table of engine, frame and gearbox numbers with invoice dates.

Under a sub-heading that says "Larger percentage of KSS, KS, KT, KE plus odd KES" (presumably in the works records at the time) it has frame number 1436 for Dec. 1927, and 1461 for Jan. 1928, so let me guess your frame KT1440 is from a model KT of 1928. Manufacturers started making "next year's model" in August/Sept the previous year. That said, Rhodes lists various frame prefixes, but "KT" is not among them.

Anyway, the dating table is somewhat cryptic. There is a bunch of 1xxx frame numbers in 1931-2 (looks like a mass typo to me), and also the short-lived 1930 model KTP had its own frame number series, starting at 1, but it doesn't look like that got as high as 1400.

I reckon 1928, but better check with an expert!

Cheers

Leon


18
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help identifying bike frame
« on: December 15, 2017, 10:05:12 PM »

https://www.yesterdays.nl/product/velocette-1930-kss-350cc-1-cyl-ohc-2603/

Interesting to compare lugs, and even the battery platform. Not sure how long the twin front down tubes lasted - maybe 1933-4 or so.

Best for Christmas,

Leon


19
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help identifying bike frame
« on: December 15, 2017, 09:47:57 PM »

Velo frame numbers are reasonably well known - happy to look it up if you like, but I can't do it if I don't know it. 95% of British frame numbers are stamped on the seat lug or the steering head.

Leon

20
Identify these bikes! / Re: Help identifying bike frame
« on: December 14, 2017, 10:53:01 PM »

Nice frame, rotten photos! I think you'll find it's one of the road-going cammy Velocettes from the 1930s: http://www.velocetteowners.com/catalogues/cataloges/1930s_cat.html

Cheers

Leon

21
Identify these bikes! / Re: Rusted, hanging on the wall in a Melbourne cafe
« on: December 07, 2017, 08:33:54 AM »
What about those handlebars?  :o

"The bees knees" I'd say. I'd love to step into the photo and have a chat with those two.

Leon

22
Identify these bikes! / Re: Rusted, hanging on the wall in a Melbourne cafe
« on: December 06, 2017, 08:44:36 PM »

Yes John - I was thinking of you only yesterday when I saw this photo - from Rockhampton, Queensland, on ebay Australia. Must have been a hot bed of Chater Leas!

Cheers

Leon

23
British Bikes / Re: Thread size
« on: November 12, 2017, 08:48:44 PM »

Hi Phil,

It's worth pointing out that Ian has a long record of being extremely helpful, and always civil, both here and elsewhere.

In this case, he makes an excellent point. The question is not so much the thread size on a brand new B31, but the thread size on a particular 70-year-old B31. They could easily be two different things. Measure the threads on your bolts with a micrometer/vernier and a thread pitch gauge, and look up the corresponding thread (Radco's The Vintage Motorcyclist's Workshop has comprehensive tables). If it's bizarre or unexpected then it's worth asking on a forum, but otherwise...

Leon

24
British Bikes / Re: 55' 350 Goldie wheel spokes question.
« on: November 07, 2017, 10:32:10 PM »

Hi Ken,

There is a well-known expression that describes a 0.250" nipple in a 0.300" hole, but let's just call it wrong. Sounds like the washers under the nipples were there to stop the nipples falling through the rim!!

I enjoy building wheels, and I have a bit of an eye for them. A properly-built spoked wheel is a lovely thing, but badly-built wheels are everywhere. Two of the common problems are wrong nipple size and mismatched rims/hub combinations. A variation of the latter problem is when the rim has been laced to the wrong sides of an asymmetric  hub.

Hopefully your new nipples will be the correct size for the holes in the rim. Before you start building the wheel, use a spoke with a nipple attached to look at how the dimpling and drilling on your rim suits your hub: push the nipple hard into the hole with your thumb and the spoke should point quite closely to the hole it is to go in on the hub flange.

Cheers

Leon

25
British Bikes / Re: 55' 350 Goldie wheel spokes question.
« on: November 07, 2017, 09:25:26 AM »

Practice makes perfect! Enjoy. Don't forget to oil the nipples - the thread and the outside - for smooth tensioning, or use anti-seize if you're going stainless.

Cheers

Leon

26
Autojumble / Re: wanted for 1924 raleigh 350
« on: November 07, 2017, 09:20:57 AM »

There are a couple of different sizes - can you let us know which one you are looking for?

Leon

27
British Bikes / Re: 55' 350 Goldie wheel spokes question.
« on: November 06, 2017, 05:47:20 AM »

Hi Kennij,

These washers were used a lot on bicycle wheels, to spread the load from the nipple. I've also seen them used on vinatge steel and alloy motorcycle rims  for the same purpose, so if you have older alloy rims it might be a good idea to use something similar. However on a dimpled rim, properly drilled so that each spoke hole points towards the appropriate hole on the rim, nipple washers should not be necessary.

A couple of warnings. Nipples come in 0.025" steps in diameter, so make sure your new nipples are a good fit to the holes in your rim. Tighten the spokes carefully and uniformly and by hand. It's surprisingly easy to damage a rim or hub with over-excited used of an electric screwdriver!

Cheers

Leon

28
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 09, 2017, 10:37:56 PM »

OK. I've dug out the Show Issues of The Motor Cycle which I should have done before putting pen to paper.

1928 colour scheme was black tank with red nose, 1929 had the white splash as per Helmut's CE-1929 image and the Charles Howell bike. The Motor Cycle used the same CE-1929 illustration posted by Helmut. Amazingly "last year's model" is discussed in the Show Report - no embarrassment about selling off unsold bikes from the previous year.

Cheers

Leon

29
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 09, 2017, 10:19:06 PM »

Fabulous Helmut - thanks for posting! Looks like the white splash is good for 1929 as well. Of course CE was a pretty small manufacturer, and around 1930 their "bread and butter" was the little pressed-frame two stroke, and their glamour bikes were the big twins, so the singles may have been produced in pretty small numbers with somewhat variable spec. But the CH-1929 photo is pretty good evidence that the bike was around in that year.

I wonder if Charles Howell rode the bike to work at the studio?

Times have changed.

Cheers

Leon

30
Identify these bikes! / Re: Bike ID Please
« on: October 09, 2017, 09:43:11 AM »

Re the date, I think (but I'm not absolutely certain) that the white splash on the CC tanks was a 1930-1931-ish thing. Earlier in the 1920s, the tank was black with a scarlet nose.

Leon

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 46