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British Bikes / Re: Smiths Speedo Drive
« Last post by L.A.B. on September 27, 2020, 02:09:13 PM »
According to the Smiths list, the correct speedo drive gearbox for a Norton Electra would be a 2:1 reversing BG 5330/257.

The speedo would be an SSM 2001/02 and 5ft. 2 inch DF 9110/00 cable.
   
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British Bikes / Re: Smiths Speedo Drive
« Last post by Mark M on September 27, 2020, 09:31:28 AM »
Yes, Rex is right about the cables being different. Fortunately Hitchcocks Motorcycles sell a selection of lengths with the correct Smiths fitting at the drive end (rear wheel) and the appropriate Metric (12mm?) fitting at the instrument end. He is also correct about the cable entry point on the Indian speedometers but they are also deeper in section than either Smiths Magnetic or Chronometric units which might be an issue on some makes, especially if it's mounted in a headlight shell.
REgards, Mark
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British Bikes / Re: Smiths Speedo Drive
« Last post by Rex on September 27, 2020, 08:38:32 AM »
The Indian stuff looks OK if you just want to fill the space where a speedo should be, but as the speedo heads are all magnetic the cable entry is central unlike Chrono heads where the cable entry is off-set, and this causes fitting problems for some bikes.
I wasn't aware that the Indian stuff had any variables with regards to ratios etc, and in my (thankfully limited experience) they only have two settings, new or fecked, and with a month's gap between the two.
But then for twenty quid.... :-\
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British Bikes / Re: Smiths Speedo Drive
« Last post by R on September 26, 2020, 11:21:03 PM »
If this is for your Electra ?, you need to study the parts book to see what Smiths speedo drive AND SPEEDO was specified.

Somewhere about then, speedos switched from chronometric (clock mechanism) to magnetic type, and the speedo
drives switched from generally being 2:1 ratio to 12:15 ratio.
The numbers on the speedo face will tell you what you have, and need in the way of speedo drives, but need some interpreting.

Be aware that India now supplies a vast range of replica stuff, but you need to be sure what you need for it all to work together,
they supply a number of varieties that are not entirely equivalent to what used to be supplied.
Beware in particular of 12mm fittings on cables and speedos, this is a new standard and must all be matched.
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Japanese Bikes / Re: Help with idle/compression on suzuki gt125.
« Last post by murdo on September 26, 2020, 10:11:40 PM »
Right, have you checked to see that the coils are getting 12 volt, that they are within range for resistance (both primary and secondary), that the plug wires and caps have the correct resistance, that the condensers are within spec and the points are set correctly. (Do this to eliminate any variables in the sparks)
Have you cleaned the pipes/baffles yet?
With good sparks and compressions, the next thing to look at is carb float height with engine running. Place a small clear plastic hose on the bowl drain and hold up beside the carb body, then open the drain screw. The fuel will run up the hose to the same level as is in the bowl. Are these the same between the two carbs?
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Japanese Bikes / Re: Help with idle/compression on suzuki gt125.
« Last post by Gsa60 on September 26, 2020, 06:05:16 PM »
Here is the pic of the plugs.
It is rotated, but the one on the top is for the right cylinder.
Cheers
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Japanese Bikes / Re: Help with idle/compression on suzuki gt125.
« Last post by Gsa60 on September 26, 2020, 06:04:03 PM »
Hi again,
So i finally got some newer parts.
I turns out that the needle that ataches to the float was too high.
Now, I am able to set the float height as 19.9mm
I managed to source also rest of parts with the same values as the spec.
I am trying to tune the carbs but seems to still run too rich at idle.
I even reduced the pilot air screws from 20 to 15. It is still not enough. The right spark plug is completely black.
What else am I missing?
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Japanese Bikes / Re: Honda cb175k6, 1972 re-build
« Last post by Terrotmt1 on September 26, 2020, 05:15:31 PM »
Copy, but from respected Honda classic specialist David Silver, so should be good, they don't sell tat, BUT, all these specialists rely on supplier QA control..
I think it is all in and tied/clamped down and the tank on now, so hope I don't need to move it!

Utterly scuppered until the chrome is collected on Tuesday, then I can get going again.

Since learnt that it was the USA bikes that had a voltage regulator, the UK bikes did not have one.
There is a modern rectifier that has a voltage reg in it which switches the generator to high output mode every time it runs.
Tempted!
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British Bikes / Re: Smiths Speedo Drive
« Last post by Mark M on September 26, 2020, 04:44:21 PM »
Yep, they aren't. Variations include drive cable exit above or below the wheel spindle, spindle hole size (usually larger on heavier bikes,) and crucially, gear ratio. Most British bikes used a standard 2:1 ratio but there are numerous other variations. On later boxes this will be stamped onto the circular keeper plate that holds the ring gear in place but can only be seen when the box is off the wheel. Earlier models (up to about 1961?) were a different shape, rather square in section, and have the part number stamped on the brass plug that retains the small worm gear. These do not have the ratio on them.
REgards, Mark
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Japanese Bikes / Re: Honda cb175k6, 1972 re-build
« Last post by Mark M on September 26, 2020, 04:37:10 PM »
Some manufacturers produced 'generic' wiring looms to cover several different models or different market variations. I've come across redundant wiring on Honda, Suzuki and Moto Guzzi for instance. I can't explain the short wiring, is it an original Honda part or a copy?
REgards, Mark
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